Participants

Co-Organizers:

Confirmed participants include the following leaders from the business, academic, and public interest communities:

Jim Banister (SpectrumDNA)

Jim BanisterJim Banister is CEO of SpectrumDNA, Inc., a studio based in Park City, Utah, developing web/wireless “engines of engagement.” He is the author of the book ”Word of Mouse: The New Age of Networked Media” (Agate Fine Print, August 2004), and donates his time as Executive Creative Director the Center for Applied Media (Park City, UT), a non-profit institute for digital media education and enterprise incubation. The common thread of Jim’s career is in engaging audiences through a mix of content and technology, and generating revenue doing it. Jim created and managed TRW’s Engineering Visualization Center; producing award-winning television and film properties; designed and built the multi-media and post-production system for Steven Spielberg’s Survivors of the Shoah Visual History Project; and created the XQuest television/cross-media franchise, currently being developed in partnership with Ron Howard and Imagine Entertainment.He also spent five years at Warner Bros. Online, where he was a prime-mover of the company’s digital media strategy and programming development, first as VP Production & Technology, and ultimately as Chief Development Officer. His formal training includes a BS in Physics from San Diego State University, and an MS in Electrical Engineering (Entertainment Technology) from the University of Southern California

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Ian Bogost (Georgia Tech)

Ian BogostDr. Ian Bogost is an award-winning videogame designer and media philosopher. He is Professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology (where he is also Director of the Graduate Program in Digital Media) and Founding Partner at Persuasive Games LLC. His research and writing considers videogames as an expressive medium, and his creative practice focuses on political games and artgames. Bogost is author or co-author of seven books, includingUnit Operations, Persuasive Games, Racing the Beam, Newsgames, and the forthcoming How To Do Things with Videogames and Alien Phenomenology. Bogost’s videogames cover topics as varied as airport security, disaffected workers, the petroleum industry, suburban errands, and tort reform. His games have been played by millions of people and exhibited internationally. His most recent game, A Slow Year, a collection of game poems for Atari, won the Vanguard and Virtuoso awards at the 2010 Indiecade Festival.

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Tracy Brown (Evil Genius Designs)

Tracy BrownTracy Kobeda Brown is the CEO & Founder of Evil Genius Designs, Inc., a spin-off company from the Entertainment Technology Center (ETC) at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). Evil Genius Designs owns and markets a mobile gaming platform that allows any player’s mobile or wireless device to engage in games developed by the company. Prior to pursuing her Masters from CMU, she was a corporate executive for American Eagle Outfitters, where she was responsible for the information security for the entire company, and the director of information technology for the company’s e-commerce business. Tracy spent years as a technology strategy consultant at Andersen Consulting. She was also the chairman and board director of the Merchant Risk Council, a non-profit organization that educated merchants on how to fight cybercrime as well as a board director for the National Cyber-Forensics Training Alliance (NCFTA), a non-profit organization for industry, law enforcement and academia to collaborate on cybercrime topics. Tracy spent a summer working with Activision and is credited on James Bond: Quantum of Solace. She also produced an experimental alternate reality game, The Deep Sleep Initiative, which won 2nd place at Indiecade 2009. Tracy has been a semi-professional gamer in Call of Duty and Battlefield for the Pandora’s Mighty Soldiers (PMS Clan), the world’s largest all female gaming clan, and is the General of North American PC gaming. In addition to her Masters in Entertainment Technology from CMU, Tracy holds a BS in Economics from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania concentrating in Decision Sciences and Insurance/Risk Management.

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Sharon Chang (Yoxi)

Sharon ChangSharon Chang is the Founder of Yoxi and former Chief Creative Officer of 19 Entertainment (American Idol). Yoxi uses a blend of reality TV formats and social networking techniques to uncover “social innovation rockstars” who can drive and inspire positive social change. Sharon is also an award-winning creative director, brand strategist, animal-lover, travel addict, and philanthropist. Follow her on Twitter at@sharonchang and her startup at @yoxi_play.

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Daniel Debow (Rypple)

Daniel DebowDaniel Debow is co-founder and co-CEO of Rypple, where he drives marketing, engineering and product development initiatives. Rypple is web-based social software that great teams use for ongoing feedback and coaching. Prior to Rypple, Daniel co-founded and served as VP of corporate development and marketing at Workbrain, a workforce management software company that listed Wal-Mart, Target, Best Buy, Citigroup, and British Airways amongst its more than 250 global clients. Daniel was one of the founders and the VP of Corporate Development and Marketing for Workbrain, an enterprise software company. He led Workbrain’s sale to Infor for $227m in 2007. Daniel is a regular contributor to Fortune.com  and the Huffington Post, and has been widely quoted in the Financial Times, the Economist and Bloomberg Businessweek.  He holds a JD/MBA from the University of Toronto and an LLM in Law, Science and Technology from Stanford University, and is an active member of the Young Presidents Organization.  He lives in Toronto with his wife and son.

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Sebastian Deterding (Hans Bredow Institute)

Sebastian DeterdingSebastian Deterding, M.A., studied Comparative Literature, Communication, Psychology, and Philosophy at the Westfälische Wilhelms-University Münster and Brown University, Providence, USA. After finishing his studies, he worked several years as program manager and online editor-in-chief at the multimedia department of the Federal Agency for Civic Education, Germany. He was the product manager of the e-democracy application “Wahl-O-Mat”, project lead of a social networking site for civic youth engagement, and edited several online dossiers on topics including open source, copyright and video games. His stay at the Federal Agency was interrupted by a short commission to the Information Society Division of UNESCO, Paris, where he worked on information policy and internet governance. Subsequently, Sebastian became a research associate at the GATE Game Research for Training and Entertainment Project at the University of Utrecht, The Netherlands, where he developed design guidelines for persuasive games, before moving on to become a user experience designer at the publishing company Gruner+Jahr AG & Co KG in Hamburg, where he was UX project lead for the redesign of a major news site. Since October 2009, Sebastian has been a junior researcher at the Hans Bredow Institute and has been working on research projects at the intersection of code, governance, persuasion and game design. He is a staff member of the Research and Transfer Centre “Digital Games and Online Worlds” at the Hans Bredow Institute. His research interests include the persuasive design of games and digital media, new media governance, fictional transmedia worlds and their communities, and Goffmanian frame analysis as a theoretical approach to fiction and video games.

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Julian Dibbell (Pleimunni Enterpises)

Julian DibbellJulian Dibbell has, in the course of over a decade of writing and publishing, established himself as one of digital culture’s most thoughtful and accessible observers. He has written essays and articles on hackers, computer viruses, online communities, encryption technologies, music pirates, and the heady cultural, political, and philosophical questions that tie these and other digital-age phenomena together. Currently a contributing editor for Wired magazine, he lives in South Bend, Indiana.

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Omar Divina (Badgeville)

Omar DivinaOmar is responsible for leading Badgeville’s sales and business development efforts out of our New York office.  Over the course of his 15-plus year career, Omar has held a variety of senior positions in sales, business development, and operations, with the past four years focused on growing SaaS companies.  Prior to joining Badgeville, Omar was at enterprise social collaboration leader Socialtext where he established critical footholds in Media/Entertainment, Publishing, Advertising, Financial and Professional Services sectors, among others.  As VP of Client Services for SunGard Trading Systems/BRASS, he managed a team responsible for driving the adoption and increased usage of high-speed trade order management and execution platforms.  Omar has a B.A. in Philosophy from Yale University and lives in Brooklyn, NY. @odivina

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Stew Friedman (Wharton)

Stewart FriedmanStew Friedman has been a faculty member of the Wharton School since 1984. He became the Management Department’s first Practice Professor in recognition of his work on the application of theory and research to the real challenges facing organizations. As the founding director of the Wharton Leadership Program, he was responsible for the design and delivery of the required Wharton MBA course, Foundations of Leadership and Teamwork, based on an action-learning approach. He also initiated and leads the Wharton Work/Life Integration Project. Stew recently concluded a two-year assignment as a senior executive at Ford Motor Company, where he served as director of the Leadership Development Center (LDC), running a 50-person, $25 MM operation. Stew worked for five years in the health care industry before earning his Ph.D. (1984) from the University of Michigan. He has published three books and written numerous articles on work/life integration, leadership, teamwork, and the dynamics of individual and organizational change, including the widely cited Harvard Business Review article, Work and Life: The End of the Zero-sum Game. His Work and Family – Allies or Enemies? (Oxford University Press, 2000), based on a study of business school alumni, was honored by the Wall Street Journal as one of the field’s best books in 2000. He has consulted with executives in a wide range of industries as well as in the public sector, including then Vice President Al Gore, and he conducts seminars and workshops globally on total leadership, creating change, and strategic human resource issues.

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Jessica Goldfin (Knight Foundation)

Jessica GoldfinJessica Goldfin joined Knight Foundation in 2007 as an intern, and was hired as journalism program associate at Knight Foundation in January 2008. In March 2011 she was promoted to the President’s Office. She assists the President and CEO and explores how games can be used to inform and engage communities. In her previous work experience, Goldfin interned in the publications department at the Art Institute of Chicago, worked as an archaeological data analyst at the Florida Bureau of Historic Preservation and excavated in Chianti, Italy and Petra, Jordan.

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Irene Greif (IBM)

Irene GreifIrene Greif heads the Collaborative User Experience Group (CUE), a team of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) researchers based in Cambridge, MA.  The group has historically worked most closely with Lotus product teams on collaboration software and is now extending its impact to other parts of Software Group and to IBM’s service businesses. In 2008, together with Software Group, Global Services and the CIO, Greif formed the Center for Social Software. Irene is a former faculty member of Computer Science at University of Washington and of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. She headed a research group in the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science which developed shared calendar, co-authoring, and real-time collaboration systems. She is a fellow of both the Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Association of Computing Machinery (ACM.) Irene was inducted into the Women In Technology International (WITI) Hall of Fame in 2000 and awarded the Women Entrepreneurs in Science and Technology Leadership award in 2008. In 2010, Irene was elected to the National Academy of Engineering.

Irene joined Lotus in 1987, formed Lotus Research in 1992, and merged that group into the IBM Research Division in 2000. Recent product innovations from her group include the core features now shipping in Lotus Connections: social bookmarking (dogear); business activities. As a strategist in the Research Division, she directs a Design Institute and the worldwide research investment in social software and collaborative visualization. Irene received her S.B. in Mathematics, her S.M. and her PhD. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, all from MIT.

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Bob Hawkins (World Bank)

Bob HawkinsRobert Hawkins is a Senior Education Specialist with the World Bank Institute where he is managing the ICT (Information and Communication Technology) for Education component of the Education program and has recently taken over as task manager for the Africa Virtual University.  The ICT for Education work assists developing countries to effectively use technology in their class rooms to improve teaching and learning – at both the secondary and tertiary levels.  Prior to joining the World Bank Institute, Robert spent four years working for the World Bank Africa region, promoting ICT connectivity, policy, and capacity building. Prior to coming to the Bank, Mr. Hawkins worked at the White House on NAFTA legislation and worked for the United States Information Agency in Seville, Spain. He received his MA from the Johns Hopkins School for Advanced International Studies (SAIS), with a concentration in economics and Latin American studies and his BA from the University of Notre Dame

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Mario Herger (SAP)

Mario HergerMARIO HERGER is a Senior Innovation Strategist at SAP Labs in Palo Alto, California and global head of the Gamification Initiative at SAP. He has worked in the past on a series of new SAP products and drives several communities around innovative topics at SAP. He has a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the Vienna University of Technology and an undergraduate degree in International Business Management. He recently played through all levels of the iPad game Air Attack and currently works with his four year old son on reaching the final level of Angry Birds.

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Dan Hunter (NY Law School)

Dan HunterDan Hunter is an expert in internet law, intellectual property, and artificial intelligence and cognitive science models of law. He joins the New York Law School faculty from the University of Melbourne Law School (Australia) and the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He holds a Ph.D. from Cambridge University on the nature of legal reasoning, as well as computer science and law degrees from Monash University (Australia) and a Master in Laws from the University of Melbourne.  Prior to joining Wharton he taught on the law faculty at Cambridge University. He regularly publishes on issues dealing with the intersection of computers and law, including papers dealing with the regulation of virtual worlds, the use of artificial intelligence in law, and high technology aspects of intellectual property. He is the co-author of one book (Building Intelligent Legal Information Systems, Kluwer 1994), is a judge for the resolution of domain name disputes for the World Intellectual Property Organization, and is on the editorial board of numerous journals. He is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship, an American Council of Learned Societies Research Fellowship, a Herchel Smith Research Fellowship in Intellectual Property Law, and a Science Commons Fellowship. He was one of the first scholars to examine the social significance of virtual worlds, co-founded the scholarly blog Terra Nova (terranova.blogs.com), and ran the 2006 State of Play/Terra Nova Conference at New York Law School, and the 2007 State of Play Conference in Singapore. His current projects include examination of the economics and laws relating to user-generated content, and the social significance of luxury handbags.

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Tom Kalil (The White House)

TomKalilThomas Kalil is currently serving as the Deputy Director for Policy for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Senior Advisor for Science, Technology and Innovation for the National Economic Council. Kalil is on leave from UC Berkeley, where he was Special Assistant to the Chancellor for Science and Technology. In 2007 and 2008, Kalil was as the Chair of the Global Health Working Group for the Clinton Global Initiative, where he developed new public and private sector initiatives in areas such as maternal and child health, under-nutrition, and vaccines. Previously, Thomas Kalil served as Senior Fellow with the Center for American Progress, member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Nanomix, the Deputy Assistant to President Clinton for Technology and Economic Policy, the Deputy Director of the White House National Economic Council, the NEC’s “point person” on a wide range of technology and telecommunications issues, and member of President Clinton to serve on the G-8 Digital Opportunity Task Force (dot force). Prior to joining the White House, Tom was a trade specialist at the Washington offices of Dewey Ballantine and the principal staffer to Gordon Moore as Chair of the SIA Technology Committee. Tom received a B.A. in political science and international economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, and completed graduate work at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He is the author of articles and op-eds on several topics, including S&T policy, the use of prizes as a tool for stimulating innovation, nanotechnology, U.S.-Japan trade negotiations, and electronic commerce.

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Yasmin Kafai (Penn GSE)

YasminKafaiBorn in Germany, Dr. Kafai undertook her studies on learning theories and technologies in France, Germany, and the United States. She received her doctorate from Harvard University while working with Seymour Papert at the MIT Media Laboratory. From 1994 to 2008, she was on the faculty of the UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information Studies. Her research on children’s learning as designers of games, simulations, and virtual worlds has received generous funding from the National Science Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, and the MacArthur Foundation. She was one of the first educators to receive an Early Career Award from the National Science Foundation in addition to a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Academy of Education. As part of her policy work, she wrote Under the Microscope: A Decade of Gender Equity Interventions in the Sciences(2004) and worked on Tech-Savvy Girls: Educating Girls in the Computer Age (2000), a report for the American Association of University Women. At the National Academy of Sciences, she briefed the Telecommunication and Computer Science Board for Being Fluent with Information Technology (1999) and is currently on the steering committee for the workshop series Computational Thinking for Everyone. A past president of the International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS), she is now the executive editor of the Journal of the Learning Sciences, together with Cindy Hmelo-Silver.

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Jonas Karlsson (Xerox)

Jonas KarlssonJonas Karlsson is a researcher at the Xerox Research Center Webster. He received his PhD in Computer Science at the University of Rochester, participating in the development of virtual reality environments. He currently leads the 3D Virtual Worlds Initative investigating ways to create new products and services using virtual world technologies. In addition, he provides information and guidance for Xerox business groups and customers on effective ways to take advantage of virtual worlds. In 2006 he co-led the Kuurian Expedition in Second Life, which provided a forum for exploring innovative uses of Second Life.

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Amy Jo Kim (Shufflebrain)

Amy Jo KimAmy Jo Kim is an internationally recognized expert in online social architecture. She has designed social architecture for Electronic Arts/Maxis/Origin, Digital Chocolate, MTV/Harmonix, eBay, There.com, Yahoo!, and others. Her influential book Community Building on the Web (published 2000), translated into 7 languages, is required reading in universities and game companies around the world. She has a PhD in Behavioral Neuroscience from University of Washington, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from UCSD.

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Karim Lakhani (Harvard Business School)

Karim LakhaniKarim R. Lakhani is an assistant professor in the Technology and Operations Management Unit at the Harvard Business School. He specializes in the management of technological innovation in firms and communities. His research is on distributed innovation systems and the movement of innovative activity to the edges of organizations and into communities. He has extensively studied the emergence of open source software communities and their unique innovation and product development strategies. He has also investigated how critical knowledge from outside of the organization can be accessed through innovation contests. He is the principal investigator and director of the Harvard-NASA Tournament Laboratory, which aims to systematize the use of innovation tournaments for the space agency.

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Edith Law (CMU)

Edith LawEdith Law is a Ph.D. student in the Machine Learning Department at CMU and a Microsoft Graduate Research Fellow . Her advisors are Tom Mitchell and Luis von Ahn. She is interested in research that will further our understanding about how to build effective systems that are capable of learning from the crowd using the Human Computation framework. Edith’s research is at the intersection of HCI and machine learning.

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Liz Lawley (Rochester Institute of Technology)

Liz LawleyElizabeth Lane Lawley is the director of the Lab for Social Computing at the Rochester Institute of Technology, where she is also an associate professor of Interactive Games & Media. Her current teaching and research interests focus on social computing technologies, including collaborative information creation and retrieval, and social aspects of game design and play.

Professor Lawley received her master’s degree in Library Science from the University of Michigan in 1987. In the early 1990s she worked as a Government and Law Bibliographer at the Library of Congress and then as manager of customer support for Congressional Information Service. In 1992 she founded Internet Training & Consulting Services, which provided services to a number of clients in business, government, and education throughout the 1990s. She received her doctorate in Information Science from the University of Alabama in 1999. During the 2005-2006 academic year, and during the summers of 2007 and 2008, she served as a Visiting Researcher at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington.

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Nicole Lazzaro (XODesign)

Nicole LazzaroNicole Lazzaro, the founder (in 1992) and President of XEODesign, Inc., has twenty years expertise in Player Experience Design (PXD) for mass-market entertainment products. Widely recognized as one of the top women working in video games and a pioneering, leading figure in mobile and social games, Fast Company considers Nicole one of the 100 most influential women in high tech, and Gamasutra voted her one of the Top 20 women working in video games. Nicole has spoken at the US State Department, and has been widely cited by media sources, including Wired, Fast Company, and ABC News. She has improved over 100 million player experiences and has worked with companies such as EA, Ubisoft, Disney, PlayFirst, and Nickelodeon on such popular franchises as three of the Myst series and Jeopardy Online. She also provided creativity coaching for the designers of The Sims. Nicole was the first person to use facial expressions to measure player experiences and has done ground breaking research on the relationship of emotion to games. Her research discovered that people’s favorite player experiences (PX) generate strong emotions to create engagement. Called the Four Keys to Fun, Nicole found that best selling games offer at least three of four play styles. The Four Keys to Fun framework for how games create engagement with emotion has inspired hundreds of thousands of developers worldwide to craft more emotions from play including world famous authors such as Raph Koster and Jesse Schell. Nicole has an undergraduate degree in Psychology from Stanford University where she also studied film making and computer programming.

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Joey Lee (Teachers College)

Joey LeeJoey J. Lee, PhD, is an Assistant Professor of Technology and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. His research interests are in gamification, social issue games, identity, and games as designed experiences for learning.

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Alix Levine (Cronus Global)

Alix LevineAlix N. Levine is the director of research for Cronus Global, a security consulting firm. She specializes in the study of homegrown extremism and online mobilization. Alix writes on a variety of terror-related issues, including the ideologies, activities and tactics of domestic and international terrorist movements, and in particular their online activity. Al Qaeda has directly referenced her work. Alix works closely with law enforcement on terror-related investigations and provides training and analysis for the law enforcement community. She received her master’s degree in Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard University and speaks Arabic and Hebrew.

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Bob Litan (Kauffman Foundation)

Bob LitanRobert E. Litan is the vice president for Research and Policy at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation in Kansas City, where he oversees the Foundation’s extensive program for funding data collection and research relating entrepreneurship and economic growth. Dr. Litan is a senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution, where he previously was vice president and director of Economic Studies. Dr. Litan has authored or co-authored more than twenty books, edited another fourteen, and authored or co-authored more than 200 articles on a broad range of public policy issues. Recent books he has co-authored include: Good Capitalism, Bad Capitalism, and the Economics of Growth and Prosperity ,and Competitive Equity: Developing a Lower Cost Alternative for Mutual Funds. Dr.Litan has been a lecturer in banking law at the Yale Law School, consulted for numerous organizations, and testified as an expert witness in a variety of legal and regulatory proceedings. Among his various assignments, he has written a number of influential federal reports, including studies for the Treasury Department on the role of the Community Reinvestment Act after the Financial Modernization Act of 1999 and the Treasury Department’s report, American Finance in the 21st Century. Dr. Litan has served in several capacities in the federal government, including his roles as the associate director of the Office of Management and Budget and the Deputy Assistant Attorney General. Dr. Litan received his B.S. in economics (summa cum laude) from the Wharton School of Finance at the University of Pennsylvania; his J.D. from Yale Law School; and both his M. Phil. and Ph.D. in economics from Yale University.

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Ethan Mollick (Wharton)

Ethan MollickI am the Edward B. and Shirley R. Shils Assistant Professor of Management at Wharton, where I study innovation and entrepreneurship. My research includes papers on the role of founding team members in the success of start ups; the way in which communities of users come together to innovate; and the factors that drive the performance of entrepreneurial companies.  Also, I co-authored a book on the intersection between video games and business that was named one of the American Library Association’s top ten business books of 2009. I received my PhD and MBA from MIT’s Sloan School of Management and my bachelor’s degree from Harvard, magna cum laude.  I was a cofounder of a company, a management consultant, and have worked with organizations ranging from DARPA to General Mills on topics of innovation and entrepreneurship.  I teach the introductory entrepreneurship class for Wharton MBAs, Management 801.

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Beth Noveck (NYLS)

Beth NoveckBeth Simone Noveck is a Professor of Law. She served in the White House as United States Deputy Chief Technology Officer (2009-2011) and leader of the White House Open Government Initiative(@opengov). Dr. Noveck served on the Obama-Biden Transition Team and was a volunteer advisor to the Obama for America campaign on issues of technology, innovation, and government reform. She focuses her scholarship, activism and teaching on the future of democracy in the 21st century. With the support of the MacArthur Foundation, she is developing an agenda for interdisciplinary research on institutional innovation. With support, she designed and built the U.S. government’s first expert network.  She also received a grant from ICAIR to support the creation of Democracy Island, an experimental space within a virtual world for research on citizen participation. She is currently working with colleagues inside government and out on the design for “IOPedia,” a platform for mashing up and visualizing public corporate accountability data and tracking the evolution of organizations. Dr. Noveck founded the State of Play conference, on videogames, virtual worlds and society. She was named “One of the Hundred Most Creative People in Business” by Fast Company magazine and “One of the Top 5 Game Changers” by Politico in 2010. A graduate of Harvard University and Yale Law School, she holds a PhD from the University of Innsbruck and is the author of Wiki Government: How Technology Can Make Government Better, Democracy Stronger, and Citizens More Powerful , and co-editor of The State of Play: Law, Games and Virtual Worlds. She tweets @bethnoveck.

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Eloise Oyzon (RIT)

Elouise OyzonElouise comes to IT by way of fine arts and computer animation. She holds a bachelors degree in Fine Arts, printmaking (etchings, lithography, woodcuts), and her masters degree in Fine Arts, Computer Animation. Her work has been shown in exhibitions and shows internationally. While her route to information technology has been unusual, she brings as her primary interest the goal to use interactive multimedia to make rich aesthetic experiences, and to explore its communication and creative potential.

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Rajat Paharia (Bunchball)

Rajat PahariaRajat Paharia is the founder and Chief Product Officer of Bunchball, the leading provider of online gamification solutions. Rajat’s skill set combines a unique understanding of technology and design that stems from a four year career at design firm IDEO where he was co-director of the Software Experiences Practice. While there he worked with clients including AT&T Wireless, Avaya, Microsoft, McDonald’s, HP and Philips. Prior to IDEO, Rajat worked at Philips Consumer Electronics, IBM Research and ViewStar. He has a Masters degree in Computer Science from Stanford University, with a focus on Human Computer Interaction, and an undergraduate degree from the University of California Berkeley.

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Andy Phelps (RIT)

Andy PhelphsAndrew Phelps is the Director of the School of Interactive Games & Media at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York. He is the founding faculty member (with a lot of help!) of the Masters of Science in Game Design & Development within the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences, as well as the Bachelors of the same name, and his work in games programming education has been featured in The New York Times, CNN.com, USA Today, National Public Radio, IEEE Computer, and several other articles and periodicals. He regularly publishes work exploring collaborative game engines and game engine technology. He maintains a website featuring his work as an educator, artist, programmer, and game addict, and currently teaches courses in multimedia programming, game engine development, 2D and 3D graphics, and game development theory. Primary research interests include online gaming, electronic entertainment, 3 dimensional graphics and real time rendering, virtual reality, interactive worlds.

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Jesse Redniss (USA Network)

Jesse RednissJesse Redniss is the vice president of digital for USA Network. In this position, he oversees all digital efforts for the various USA Network properties. Since joining USA in 2005, Redniss has played a pinnacle role in the digital restructuring and growth of the usanetwork.com properties, which has driven a major shift in the industry and competitor’s online efforts. Some of the most popular and successful USA initiatives led by Redniss, include Character Arcade, the network’s proprietary social/casual gaming portal and highly-successful alternate reality games like Covert Ops. During his time at USA Redniss has led the digital team to achieve unprecedented growth, with 40 percent increase in uniques year-over-year and industry leading time of engagement per visit in the cable industry site sector resulting in triple digit increases in traffic AND REVENUE metrics year-over-year. Redniss’s responsibilities include developing innovative digital growth strategies and overseeing the interactive campaigns for the record-breaking launches of the network’s critically acclaimed hit series such as MONK, In Plain Sight, and PSYCH. Since his involvement, the digital team has gained industry recognition through various awards, including Web Marketing Association for the Broadcast and TV ‘web site of the year, over 15 gold and silver DBA’s and the 2008 Beacon Award.  Before joining USA, Redniss worked as a digital supervisor at Tangible Media on the Atari and Midway games accounts and several leading advertising agencies specializing in media planning, buying and interactive strategy. Redniss has also held positions within the music industry at Volatile Media and SONY 550DMV.

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Scott Rigby (Immersyve)

Scott RigbyDr. Scott Rigby is president of Immersyve and a veteran of both the ivory tower and interactive media development. After earning his Ph. D. as a research psychologist in motivation, Scott spent eight years building Internet games and interactive content for Sony, Time Warner, and Viacom as well as game tie-ins for major feature films such as AI:Artificial Intelligence, Red Planet, and Frequency before founding Immersyve in 2003. His interactive work can also be seen as part of the “Explore the Universe” exhibit at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C. Scott can be contacted at scott@immersyve.com

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Jesse Schell (Schell Games/CMU)

Jesse SchellPrior to starting Schell Games in 2004, Jesse was the Creative Director of the Disney Imagineering Virtual Reality Studio, where he worked and played for seven years as designer, programmer and manager on several projects for Disney theme parks and DisneyQuest, as well as on Toontown Online, the first massively multiplayer game for kids. Before that, he worked as writer, director, performer, juggler, comedian, and circus artist for both Freihofer’s Mime Circus and the Juggler’s Guild. Jesse is also on the faculty of the Entertainment Technology Center at Carnegie Mellon University where he teaches classes in Game Design and serves as advisor on several innovative projects. Formerly the Chairman of the International Game Developers Association, he is also the author of the award winning book The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses. In 2004, he was named one of the world’s Top 100 Young Innovators by Technology Review, MIT’s magazine of innovation. His primary responsibility at Schell Games is to make sure everyone is having fun and creating beautiful things.

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Meaghan Searl (DailyFeats)

Meaghan SearlAt DailyFeats Meghan applies the mysterious art of Science to our research, design, development, and testing, performing such incantations as “data analysis” and “academic research,” while the rest of the office watches, slack-jawed, like primitive hunter-gatherers witnessing the birth of agriculture. Meghan is a board-certified clinical neuropsychologist; she received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Boston University and completed her postdoctoral training at Massachusetts General, Brigham & Women’s, and Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospitals. She is on the faculty of Harvard Medical School, is a neuropsychologist in the Division of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology at Brigham & Women’s Hospital, and is a consulting psychologist at the Partners Center for Connected Health. Her approach to DailyFeats’ science strives to help us create useful and innovative products and services by combining top-down (e.g., quantitative, data-driven) and bottom-up (e.g., qualitative, user-centered) approaches to research and development. This is important, because no one else at DailyFeats has any idea what these words mean.

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Lee Sheldon (RPI)

LeeSheldonLee Sheldon has written and designed over 20 commercial video games and MMOs. His book Character Development and Storytelling for Games is required reading at game design programs. Lee is a contributor to several books on video games including Well-Played 2.0,Writing for Video Game Genres from the IGDA, and Game Design: An Interactive Experience. He is cited in many publications and is a regular lecturer and consultant on game design and writing in the US and abroad. Before his career in video games Lee wrote and produced over 200 popular television shows, including Star Trek: The Next Generation, and Charlie’s Angels. As head writer of the daytime serial Edge of Night he received a nomination for best writing from the Writers Guild of America. Lee has been twice nominated for Edgar awards by the Mystery Writers of America. Lee began his academic career in 2006 as a professor at Indiana University where he taught game design and screenwriting. At IU Lee instituted the practice of designing classes as multiplayer games and worked on several serious and alternate reality games. He continues as creative director of the narrative-driven MMO Londontown. This fall he joined Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as Co-Director of the Games and Simulation Arts program. Having just completed writing and designing a new children’s video game, Lee is now working on two books: The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game and Practical Game Design: A Toolkit for Educators, Researchers and Developers; and is writer and design consultant on Gameforge’s upcoming Star Trek games.

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Keith Smith (Bigdoor)

Keith SmithKeith Smith is co-founder and CEO of BigDoor. Keith has been working on gamification well before the term was invented. An avid game fan, at the age of six he sold magazine subscriptions door to door in an effort to buy the original Atari Pong console. By his own admission, Keith wore out five Atari consoles and used his love of games to work his way through college as a game play counselor at Nintendo. He still knows every level and secret in Zelda and Super Mario Bros for the SNES. Gamification again had a place later in Keith’s career when he was founder and CEO of Zango. Keith served as the CEO for 10 years and grew Zango from a startup to a multi-national company employing 300 people in six offices in four countries and multiple years was ranked among the Best Places to Work in Seattle. The company grew to $78 million in annual revenue and $24 million in EBITDA and ranked #7 on the Inc 500 list. While at Zango, Keith discovered a true passion for gamification after spending two years building a game-based loyalty program. Wanting to focus on game mechanics and gamification, and feeling the need to again scratch the entrepreneurial itch, Keith co-founded BigDoor with long-time business partner and best friend, Jeff Malek in 2009. A veteran entrepreneur, Keith started and bootstrapped two other tech companies prior to 1999. Learn more about BigDoor at www.bigdoor.com or follow him on Twitter @chiefdoorman.

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Kurt Squire (Univ. of Wisconsin)

Kurt SquireKurt Squire is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Educational Communications and Technology division ofCurriculum and Instruction and a research scientist a the Academic Advanced Distributed Learning Co-Lab.Squire is also a co-founder and current director of the Games, Learning, & Society Initiative, a group of over 50 faculty and students investigating game-based learning. Squire’s research investigates the potential of video game-based technologies for systemic change in education. Squire’s work integrates research and theory on digital media (particularly games) with theories of situated cognition in order to understand how to design educational environments in a digital age. Squire earned his doctorate in Instructional Systems Technology from Indiana University and is a former Montessori and primary school teacher. Before coming to Wisconsin, Squire was Research Manager of the Games-to-Teach Project at MIT, Co-Director of the Education Arcade, columnist for Computer Games magazine, and co-founder of Joystick101.org. In addition to writing over 50 scholarly articles and book chapters, he has given dozens invited addresses in North America, Europe, and Asia.

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Constance Steinkuhler (Univ. of Wisconsin)

Constance SteinkuhlerConstance Steinkuehler is an Assistant Professor in the Educational Communication & Technology program in the Curriculum & Instruction department at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. After researching and developing online environments designed specifically for learning for five years, she shifted her focus toward the documentation and analysis of more naturally occurring online learning environments, specifically those designed for play (MMOGs). Her dissertation in the Literacy Studies program, completed in August of 2005, was two-year online cognitive ethnography of the game Lineage (first I, now II), focusing specifically on the forms of cognition, learning, and literacy recruited from those who game. She earned her Ph.D. in Curriculum & Instruction at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2005, her MS degree in Educational Psychology at University of Wisconsin in 2000 and before that, three simultaneous BAs in 1993 at the University of Missouri-Columbia in Mathematics, English, and Religious Studies. She teaches Research in Online Virtual Worlds; Games, Learning, & Society; and Critical Instructional Practices on the Internet and runs the annual Games, Learning, and Society Conference held each June here in Madison WI. She was an associate lecturer in Educational Psychology, a Spencer fellow, and writes online for Joystick101.org and Terra Nova. Current interests include the ways in which online play spaces align (or fail to align) with practices valued outside the game – specifically, informal scientific reasoning, collaborative problem-solving, and media literacy defined not just as critical media consumption but also and equally as media production (and therefore an understanding of design).

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Doug Thomas (USC)

Douglas ThomasDouglas Thomas is Associate Professor in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California. He received his Ph. D. from the University of Minnesota in Communication in 1992 and specializes in Critical Theory and Cultural Studies of Technology. He is founding editor of Games & Culture: A Journal of Interactive Media, a quarterly international journal that aims to publish innovative theoretical and empirical research about games and culture within the context of interactive media. He is author of Reading Nietzsche Rhetorically (Guilford Press, 1998), an examination of the role of representation in the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche, and Hacker Culture (University of Minnesota Press, 2003), a study of the cultural, social, and political dimensions of computer hacking. He is co-editor of Technological Visions: The Hopes and Fears that Shape New Technologies (with Marita Sturken and Sandra Ball-Rokeach, Temple UP, 2004) and Cybercrime: Law Enforcement, Security and Surveillance in the Information Age (with Brian D. Loader; Routledge, 2000). He has testified before the U.S. Congress on issues of computer hacking, cyberterrorism, and critical infrastructrure protection. Professor Thomas is a founding member of the Critical and Cultural Studies division of the National Communication Association and has served as Chair of the division, and serves on the advisory board for the Research Center for Cyberculture Studies at the University of Washington.

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Margaret Wallace (Playmatics)

Margaret WallaceMargaret Wallace is an American entrepreneur, gaming and media professional. She is the CEO of Playmatics (www.playmatics.com), a company dedicated to bringing rich games and applications on the Internet, in social media networks, and on a variety of connected gaming platforms. Prior to forming Playmatics, Margaret was CEO of Rebel Monkey, a venture-backed company focused on creating a free-to-play game world and community platform utilizing virtual goods and microtransactions. Before Rebel Monkey, she was a founding member and CEO of Skunk Studios in San Francisco, CA, one of the first-ever casual game companies and portals. Ms. Wallace served on the Steering Committee for the International Game Developers Association (IGDA) Casual Games Special Interest Group for three years, 2005-2008. Ms. Wallace was a Co-Editor of the 2006 IGDA Casual Games White Paper and is a current member of the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences (IADAS).  She holds an MA and BS in Communication and Cultural Studies from the University of Massachusetts/Amherst and Boston University, respectively.

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Kevin Werbach (Wharton)

Kevin WerbachKevin Werbach is a leading expert on the business, policy, and social implications of emerging Internet and communications technologies. Werbach is an Associate Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics at The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He is also the founder of theSupernova Group, a technology analysis and consulting firm. He co-led the review of the Federal Communications Commission for the Obama-Biden Transition Project. Werbach is the former editor of Release 1.0, a renowned industry publication that provided leading-edge analysis of key technology trends for senior executives. Working with technology guru Esther Dyson, he co-organized the annual PC Forum conference. During the Clinton Administration, he served as Counsel for New Technology Policy at the FCC. Called “one of the few policy wonks who really got it” by Wired, he helped develop the United States Government’s e-commerce policy, shaped the FCC’s approach to Internet issues, and authored Digital Tornado, the first comprehensive analysis of the implications of the Internet. Werbach appears frequently in print and broadcast media including CNN, CNBC, NPR, ABC News, USA Today, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The News Hour with Jim Lehrer, Nightly Business Report, and The Washington Post. His writing has appeared in Harvard Business Review, Fortune, Wired, The Industry Standard, The Philadelphia Inquirer, Harvard Law Review, Slate, and Business 2.0, among other publications. Werbach is a magna cum laude graduate of Harvard Law School, where he served as Publishing Editor of the law review, and a summa cum laude graduate of the University of California at Berkeley.

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Jerry Wind (Wharton)

Jerry WindProfessor Jerry Wind is internationally known for pioneering research on organizational buying behavior, market segmentation, conjoint analysis, and marketing strategy. He consults with major firms around the world, and has lectured in over 50 universities world wide.

He is a regular contributor to the professional marketing literature, with 22 books and more than 250 research papers, articles and monographs on marketing strategy, marketing research, new product and market development, consumer and industrial buying behavior and international marketing. His 2004 book The Power of Impossible Thinking: Transform the Business of Your Life and the Life of Your Business, draws on the latest research in neuroscience to explain how a person’s mental models can distort perceptions, creating both limits and opportunities. Professor Wind is the founding editor of Wharton School Publishing, a joint venture with Pearson and has published 25 books in the first 18 months. Over the years he has served as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Marketing, the policy boards of the Journal of Consumer Research and Marketing Science, the editorial boards and guest editor of all the major marketing journals. He is the recipient of numerous academic awards, including the three major marketing awards, The Charles Coolidge Parlin Award, the AMA/Irwin Distinguished Educator Award, and the Paul D. Converse Award. Professor Wind teaches MBA courses in Marketing Strategy, Marketing Methods and Applications for Business Consulting, and a new course in creativity. Professor Wind received his PhD from Stanford University and his MA and BS degrees from The Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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Moses Wolfenstein (Academic ADL Co-Lab)

Moses WolfensteinMoses Wolfenstein is Associate Director of Research at the Academic ADL Co-Lab where he is working to advance research and development of digital media for learning. Before beginning work at the Co-Lab in September of 2010, he was a doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin–Madison where he completed his dissertation on the topic of how leadership in massively multiplayer online games can inform research on and practice of school leadership. During his time at UW, Moses also worked with his adviser Rich Halverson on School Leadership Games, with the Morgridge Institute for Research (MIR) Education Research Challenge Area (ERCA) on the use of games and digital media to represent research findings across disciplines, and at the Co-Lab in partnership with Florida Virtual School as an instructional designer and games and learning consultant. Moses also holds an MA in educational administration from Teachers College, Columbia University where he did mixed methods research and policy analysis on the New York Department of Education’s district level suspension system during its role out in 2004 – 2005. Additionally he is credentialed in mediation and conflict resolution by the ICCCR co-located on the Teachers College campus. He completed his BA at U.C. San Diego in Studio Art with a focus on conceptual and installation art. For more information about Moses you can check out his blog at http://moseswolfenstein.com.

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Michael Wu (Lithium)

Michael WuMichael Wu is the Principal Scientist of Analytics at Lithium Technologies Inc. Michael received his Ph.D. fromUC Berkeley’s Biophysics graduate program. His graduate research focuses on modeling the human brain, specifically the visual cortex, with techniques from math, physics, statistics, and machine learning. Currently, Michael is applying similar data-driven methodologies to investigate and understand the complex dynamics within online communities as well as the greater social web. Michael has developed the Community Health Index (CHI) and many predictive social analytic algorithms that bring Lithium closer to its vision of “one portal to manage the entire social web.” To tackle challenging problems like the value of WOM and social media ROI, Michael collaborates with academicians to conduct research on these important topics of social media that are presently unsolved. Michael’s R&D work at Lithium has won him the recognition as a 2010 Influential Leader by CRM Magazine. Michael has been a DOE fellow during his graduate career and was awarded 4 years of full fellowship plus stipend under the Computational Science Graduate Fellowship. During his fellowship tenure, he has also served at the Los Alamos National Lab, conducting cutting edge research in machine learning and face recognition. Prior to his graduate research, Michael received his undergraduate degree from UC Berkeleytriple majoring in Applied Math, Physics, and Molecular & Cell Biology.

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Nick Yee (PARC)

Nick YeeNick Yee has an extensive research background in the psychology of virtual environments and online interaction. He’s worked with PARC’s PlayOn group and Sony Online Entertainment to examine large data sets of behavioral data from online games. At PARC, he’s also studied how people use and react to context-aware mobile applications.

At Stanford’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, Nick conducted experiments in immersive virtual reality to explore digital self representation and social interaction. He is also well-known for the Daedalus Project, a long-running survey study of over 50,000 online gamers exploring demographic patterns, play motivations, and emergent social phenomena. His interest in online interaction began when a personality psychology professor in college asked students to create their own webpage (this was back in 1998) as a tool to understand identity projection online.

Nick received his Ph.D. in Communication from Stanford University. His work has been cited by the New York Times, CNN, the Discovery Channel, and Science, among other news outlets. In his free time, he polishes rough amber on a lapidary machine.

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Gabe Zichermann (Gamification Co.)

Gabe ZichermannGabe Zichermann is the chair of the upcoming Gamification Summit NYC (9/15-16, 2011) – where top thought leaders in this burgeoning industry gather to share knowledge and insight. Zichermann is also an author, highly rated public speaker and entrepreneur whose next book, “Gamification by Design” (O’Reilly, 2011) looks at the technical and architectural considerations for designing engagement using games concepts.  His book “Game-Based Marketing” (Wiley, 2010) achieved critical and industry acclaim for its detailed look at innovators who blend the power of games with brand strategy. A resident of NYC, Gabe is a board member of StartOut.org , advisor to a number of startups and Facilitator for the Founder Institute in Manhattan. For more information about Gabe and gamification, visit the Gamification Blog at http://gamification.co.

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